CauseLabs

Learn More Through My Stories

Looking over the shoulder of a person who is counting the money in their wallet.

Level-up Your Financial Literacy

At CauseLabs, we believe that collaboration is a critical factor for Growing Positive Impact. That’s why we like to write about the great causes and initiatives of our clients, partners, and peers. Today, we’re featuring a guest post from our friend Brandon Burton of Securing Life Today. Brandon is a United States Marine Corps Veteran …

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A man wearing headphones works at a computer station.

Advanced REST API Design

In our previous post, we covered the basics of designing a REST API: defining endpoints, using HTTP verbs and performing common read-write operations on data. In this chapter, we’re going to introduce some advanced use and edge cases you may want to consider in order to give your REST API a sound and long-lasting design.

A desk with two monitors displaying code.

What you need to know about REST.

If you are a developer and you’ve worked in any modern web application, I’m sure this term rings a bell for you. REST stands for Representational State Transfer. If you’re already familiar with the basics, hop over to our look at Advanced REST API design. If you’re in need of an intro, lets dive in and you’ll see why this architectural style has become a de-facto industry standard for back-end APIs.

A white dog swimming in a pool.

Analogous Learning and the Path to Staying Curious

When I was 6 years old, I started taking swim lessons. It was at the swimming complex at the University of Tennessee, where I remember watching the diving team practice from the 10 meter platform in complete, terrified awe. Lucky for me, I started with blowing bubbles in the shallow end. Slowly, we progressed to a swimming stroke: the doggy paddle. Did you hear that right? The doggy paddle. The instructor was teaching us how to swim like a dog.

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Wrap Up + Getting to Pilot

When we first started, we were refining a problem, onboarding your team, and setting up tools. Now, we’ll do the reverse.

A man holds up a diagram during a CauseLabs strategic workshop.

Week 4: Synthesis and Roadmap

This week may be the most important because it synthesizes everything into a decision-enabling Roadmap. This is the why. And the how. And the what to do next.

A young man uses a cell phone to test a prototype for a CauseLabs project.

Week 3: Prototyping

Starting now, we’ll take all of our work during discovery, immersion, and ideation and boil it down into something real. This week is all about the Workshop.

A woman places a sticky note on a wall during a CauseLabs strategic workshop.

Week 2: Research + Empathy

Hey gang, welcome back. Hopefully by now you’re really powering with your team and starting to feel the momentum of the process. Last week kicked things off with brainstorming and early research. Now, we’ll focus on confirming the direction, trusting your hunches, experimenting beyond your team, and seeking deeper empathy in your process. So let’s get started!

an assortment of sticky notes from a CauseLabs strategic workshop.

Week 1: Problem Immersion + Drawing Board

This week we’ll dig into the first of two sessions that we call Drawing Boards. In large part they’re exactly what they sound like: a starting place to gather the team and set the focus, built initially around the Problem Statement draft, and a place to keep referring to as the process progresses.

An assortment of supplies used in a CauseLabs strategy workshop

The 4-Week Guide for Digital Innovation

We’re here to help real people like you more easily understand what it takes to build innovative digital tools by doing a few simple things like putting people first, allowing space for collaboration, staying close to those experiencing the problems, and exploring new ways to generate ideas.

A small chalkboard with a thought bubble drawn on it and a lightbulb sitting on top of the bubble.

Problem Statements in Digital Innovation: The Importance of Asking the Right Question

It all starts with a problem. We’ve found it’s amazingly helpful to have a single statement that represents the nature of the problem, who’s experiencing it, and why it’s so important to solve. We have a simple template you can use, inspired by the ongoing work we do with our friends at IDEO.org.

A crumpled sheet of blue paper sits on top of a pen and ink drawing of a lightbulb.

Two innovation hacks you can implement immediately

My friend’s forehead was creased, his consternation visible at the intersection of his caved-in eyebrows. “I have to get out of this building to innovate. I can’t do it here. The technology, the dress code, the culture. It can’t get us where we need to go, and even if it could, it wouldn’t do it fast enough.”

It's time for your company to grow.

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